Monthly Archive for November, 2013

Avoid accidentally using cAPS LOCK (and switch keyboard layouts) with Keyla

There are two things that keep annoying me when I work, and I have just discovered that Keyla cleverly prevents both:

  1. Accidentally hitting cAPS LOCK AND TYPING EVERYTHING IN UPPERCASE, and
  2. Windows’ perpetual inability to remember what keyboard layout I want to use.

Here’s how Keyla helps to solve both of these problems. Continue reading ‘Avoid accidentally using cAPS LOCK (and switch keyboard layouts) with Keyla’

Errata: geeky details

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

I took a closer look at the images I had found yesterday and I noticed that my story was not entirely correct so I’m posting this to set things straight, rather than rewriting yesterday’s post.

I wrote that there were digits on both halves of the wristband, but the image shows all the digits on just one side. Even better, the digits are readable so I can analyze them all over again. Continue reading ‘Errata: geeky details’

“Listen to the light”

Here’s a silly little blast from the past I felt like sharing. Enjoy :-) (See also this update.)

First, a little background: Timex_Datalink_Model_150Back when I worked for Microsoft, there was often something new and curious coming along. Force-feedback joysticks, for instance. But they also had some really mind-blowing tech partnerships, like the Timex Data Link watch that was released in 1994 – that’s nearly twenty years ago! Continue reading ‘“Listen to the light”’

Who reads the license, anyway?

Terms of Service; Didn’t Read is a site that gives you a very compact summary of the terms of your favorite websites and services. There are some surprises in there but Google isn’t one of them – we already know that they have a direct line to our brains.

It’s difficult to strike a balance between privacy and usefulness. Google is getting a lot of data from me but I get a lot of convenience in return. I could also set up a lot of the services on a server of my own, using for instance Kolab.
Benefit: privacy and control over my data.
Drawback: I suddenly become responsible for uptime, security, backups, and a lot of geeky challenges.

Note: Before you run off to install your own cloud solution, you’ll need to face another important decision: Which tool do you choose?

I have half a plan to set up a home server that runs either Kolab or something comparable, but as always, other real-life tasks are more important and/or urgent so this is a project for those “long winter nights.”

How to update your Nexus 4 to Android 4.4

See the NEW and updated guide here! (July 2014)

Update 2013-11-16: Added how to get superuser access.
Update 2013-11-20: Download link now points to the newer “krt16s” version.

Disclaimer: I am not responsible for anything that happens if you follow these instructions. I am just describing what worked for me!

I have just updated my LG Nexus 4 from Android 4.2.2 to Android 4.4. I followed these instructions from Android Police but ran into a minor problem that I solved – and here’s how I solved it. In fact, let me do a complete step-by-step here for your convenience!

Continue reading ‘How to update your Nexus 4 to Android 4.4’