Tag Archive for 'data'

You do have backups … right?

Backups are important. Yes, we all know that. We’ve heard it before. Just like good passwords can save your (digital) life.

So, how are your backups doing?

dead-hd-2

Exhibit 41 in “things you never want to see”.

Ahem.

Continue reading ‘You do have backups … right?’

How to recover from MD5 mismatch

If any of the following is gibberish to you, it’s better to stop reading. Not everything I post is useful to the general public ;-)

If you’re trying to restore a backup of your Android and you get the error message “MD5 mismatch”, then here’s the solution. I was searching for this and found so much bad information. I feel that the correct information needs more publicity, so here’s my contribution to this.

First, here’s the typical problem that you’d experience:

ClockworkMod Recovery v6.0.4.7
Checking MD5 sums…
MD5 mismatch!

Continue reading ‘How to recover from MD5 mismatch’

Errata: geeky details

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

I took a closer look at the images I had found yesterday and I noticed that my story was not entirely correct so I’m posting this to set things straight, rather than rewriting yesterday’s post.

I wrote that there were digits on both halves of the wristband, but the image shows all the digits on just one side. Even better, the digits are readable so I can analyze them all over again. Continue reading ‘Errata: geeky details’

“Listen to the light”

Here’s a silly little blast from the past I felt like sharing. Enjoy :-) (See also this update.)

First, a little background: Timex_Datalink_Model_150Back when I worked for Microsoft, there was often something new and curious coming along. Force-feedback joysticks, for instance. But they also had some really mind-blowing tech partnerships, like the Timex Data Link watch that was released in 1994 – that’s nearly twenty years ago! Continue reading ‘“Listen to the light”’

Who reads the license, anyway?

Terms of Service; Didn’t Read is a site that gives you a very compact summary of the terms of your favorite websites and services. There are some surprises in there but Google isn’t one of them – we already know that they have a direct line to our brains.

It’s difficult to strike a balance between privacy and usefulness. Google is getting a lot of data from me but I get a lot of convenience in return. I could also set up a lot of the services on a server of my own, using for instance Kolab.
Benefit: privacy and control over my data.
Drawback: I suddenly become responsible for uptime, security, backups, and a lot of geeky challenges.

Note: Before you run off to install your own cloud solution, you’ll need to face another important decision: Which tool do you choose?

I have half a plan to set up a home server that runs either Kolab or something comparable, but as always, other real-life tasks are more important and/or urgent so this is a project for those “long winter nights.”